sábado, 25 de agosto de 2007

HME/OMC en la America Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

Texto original en la página: orthoinfo.aaos.org/fact/thr_report.cfm?Thread...
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Osteochondroma (Bone Tumor)

Osteochondromas occur as solitary osteochondroma (osteocartilaginous exostosis) or multiple osteochondromatosis. These are discussed separately.
Multiple Osteochondromatosis
Description
Multiple osteochondromatosis is also called multiple osteocartilaginous exostosis, familial osteochondromatosis, multiple hereditary osteochondromatosis, or diaphyseal aclasia. About 70 percent of the time, it is inherited. About 30 percent of the time, it occurs randomly. It is diagnosed when two or more osteochondromas are seen on plain X-rays. Multiple osteochondromatosis has been associated with EXT 1 and EXT 2 genes. These genes are now being studied. The way they act is not well understood.
X-ray findings are the same as with solitary osteochondromas.